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Volume 3, Issue 9

Open Access Journal

Volume 3, Issue 9

Impact Factor 3.582

1) New Light on the Early History of Walden School.
Author’s detail:Author’s details:Jeroen Staring1, Ed Bouchard2, Jerry Aldridge3

Abstract:
Walden School, a celebrated Manhattan private school, began in the Progressive Era. In the winter and spring 1913, twenty-one year old Montessori pioneer Margaret Naumburg attended the very first International Montessori Teacher Training Course in Rome, Italy. In the summer that year, in London, England, she had lessons with F. M. Alexander — in what in 1910 he referred to as “Re-education of the Kinæsthetic Systems” and in 1912 as “Conscious Control” (a method with precursors in performing arts training addressing postural, vocal, repertory and habits aspects). Later that year, Naumburg introduced a Montessori class in a Manhattan settlement house with the musician Claire Raphael, incorporating Dalcroze music and movement instruction within the Montessori framework. In 1914, Naumburg and Raphael began a Montessori class at Leete School, a private school for girls. Between 1914 and 1917, Naumburg began Jungian psychoanalysis with Beatrice Moses Hinkle. As Naumburg and Raphael had done earlier integrating movement disciplines with Montessori classes, Naumburg now incorporated psychoanalytic themes into the school curriculum. In 1917, Naumburg relocated her classes at Leete School, opened them to boys and girls, and called it Children’s School — renamed Walden School in 1922.
From its inception in 1914, New York City media reported on the mixed Montessori/creative expression/psychoanalysis/Alexander inspired educational venture. Naumburg published her accounts of the school between 1917 and 1928.
Key Words:
Margaret Naumburg (1890-1963), Claire Raphael Reis (1888-1978), Irene Tasker (1887-1977), Ethel Webb (1866-1955), F. Matthias Alexander (1869–1955), Leete School, Public School 4, Montessori education, Walden School.
[Download Full Paper] [Page 01-21]

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2) Using Family Case Studies with Graduate Students Through Transdisciplinary Graduate Education
Author Detail:(1)Jennifer L. Kilgo, Ed.D., University Professor University of Alabama at Birmingham(2)Jerry Aldridge, Ed.D., Professor Emeritus University of Alabama at Birmingham (3)Laura Vogtle, Ph.D., OTR/L, FAOTA, Professor University of Alabama at Birmingham (4)William Ronilo, M.S., PT, Clinical Faculty, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Abstract
Graduate students in early childhood special education, occupational therapy, and physical therapy at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) are educated using a transdisciplinary model in which emerging professionals and families of children with special needs work together by exchanging expertise to jointly solve problems, plan, and implement evidence-based interventions. The goal is to ensure that the early intervention/education experiences achieve desired child and family outcomes. A major component of the preparation of the graduate students is learning to work collaboratively with families. The purpose of this article is to describe the process early childhood special education, occupational therapy, and physical therapy graduate students experience through team-based problem solving with case studies of young children with delays or disabilities and their families.
Key words: transdisciplinary teams, graduate education, early intervention, families
[Download Full Paper] [Page 22-26]

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3) The Humanistic Counselling Perspective and Its Applicability in Education.
Author Detail:Dr. Christmas Denhere- Zimbabwe Ezekiel Guti University     

Abstract
In the 1950s, Rogers developed the Humanist counselling approach which he labelled the client-centred therapy or non-directive counselling. Humanism is a philosophy that is primarily concerned with humanity (i.e.) the worth of humans as individuals. It encompasses the richness of the human existential experience that emphasises the crucial role of the here and now interpersonal relationship with others and our actual subjective experiences. The perspective assumed that human maladjustment could be rectified by bringing more insights into the client’s own statements. The humanistic approach “emphasizes that each individual has great freedom in directing his or her future, a large capacity for personal growth, a considerable amount of intrinsic worth, and enormous potential for self-fulfilment”. Humanists strongly maintain that each individual was prewired with a life-long quest to keep on changing and growing. Counselling is a complex and progressive process made of several interwoven sub-processes.      While acknowledging that each individual counselling situation is unique, a general pattern emerges where individual counselling is practiced, that enables us to theorise about how individual counselling is carried out.
Keys Words: counselling  humanistic counselling  counsellor practice   perspective
[Download Full Paper] [Page 27-31]

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4) Desire for Unique Consumer Product as a Mediator between Consumer Innovativeness and New Product Adoption Behavior.
Author Detail:
(1)Dr. Minhoon Khan Laghari-Professor, Department of Business Administration,Shah Abdul Latif University Khairpur (2)Mohammad Ismail Soomro-Assistant Professor, Department of Business Administration, Shah Abdul Latif University Khairpur (3)Abrar Ahmed Malik-Phil Student, Department of Business Administration,Shah Abdul Latif University Khairpur

Abstract
This particular review designed to measure mediating role of desire for unique consumer product between consumer innovativeness and new product adoption behavior. A survey methodology was used to collect the data from the students of different universities. Structural regression (SR) model was used to test the proposed hypothesis. The results display that although consumer innovativeness has significant influence on desire for unique consumer product and also on the variables of new product adoption behavior such as consumer novelty seeking for the early product adoption behavior of the customers and consumer independent judgement making for the later product adoption behavior of the customers. The result also shows that desire for unique consumer product is not playing the mediating role between the consumer innovativeness and new product adoption behavior because desire for unique consumer product has no significant influence on the variables of new product adoption behavior.
[Download Full Paper] [Page 32-39]

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5) Experimental Modelling of wheel rut depth effect of on vehicle velocity in wet natural terrain.
Author Detail:
Franco Muleya1, Sunday Nwaubani2 and David Reid3

Abstract
This paper presents the results of an investigation into the effect of wheel rut depth on the vehicle velocity output at a given vehicle speed selection in wet clay and sand terrain beds. This experimental investigation was carried out using a highly modified and instrumented wheeled mobility scooter renamed MOBILITY SF-3713. This vehicle was run on hard ground in order to obtain benchmark results. It was then run on sand and clay terrain test beds under controlled laboratory conditions. Results from this experiment indicate that flexible tyres can behave like rigid wheels when highly inflated and operating in soft wet deformable terrain. Further analysis of results indicate that terrain type, applied load and tyre inflation pressure all have significant effects on rut depth which eventually has direct effect on vehicle velocity. The results suggest that accurate prediction of this relationship can assist earth moving and deformable haulage road engineers in making economic and operational decisions that affect time and cost management of wheeled plant. The results from the experiment also provided reliable verification of the mathematical model developed earlier.
Keywords: Wheel-soil interaction, rut depth, velocity, natural terrain
[Download Full Paper] [Page 40-48]

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6) Case Study of a Post-secondary Institution and its Response to Student Homelessness
Author Detail:(1)Katharina Kovacs Burns-University of Alberta (2)Magdalena S. Richter-University of Alberta (3)Yuping Mao-Erasmus University Rotterdam (4)Shirley Mogale-University of Alberta (5)Margaret Danko-University of Alberta

Abstract
From the moment students are accepted into post-secondary institutions, the focus is on their studies and successful completion. Far less is known about what institutions understand about students’ personal stresses and issues with their finances, housing and especially student homelessness. How are these issues identified and managed within post-secondary institutions? What is the role of the post-secondary institution around ensuring students have what they need personally to be successful in their studies? A case study design using an integrated mixed-methods approach was chosen to examine the perceptions of students, administrators, faculty and service providers at one post-secondary institution, regarding experiences with and assistance for students who are vulnerable to becoming, or are homeless. Also explored were existing and needed institutional information and supports for students, and clearly identifying responsibilities of institution and students. Perceptions varied regarding how known and accessible student information and services were for housing, food or finances, and who was responsible to ensure that these students’ personal needs were identified and met. Perspectives were similar around the need to improve policies and communications between students and institution staff and services on identifying students at risk, making centralized information and campus services more confidential and accessible, and resourcing service providers to be better prepared and able to assist vulnerable students with financial, housing and other challenges. Institutional policies and procedures need to be more transparent and student-centred, but students also need to take responsibility for their own welfare and seek out confidential campus supports before they experience crises.
Key Words: Case Study, Integrated Mixed-methods, Post-secondary Institution, Student Homelessness, Student Information, Support Services

[Download Full Paper] [Page 49-70]

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Creative Commons LicenseOnline Publications by Dr. T.S Maria is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.Based on a work at http://www.casestudiesjournal.com.